Akula

Akula was the first submarine fully developed and built by Tsarist Russia for long patrol missions. It was built at the Baltic Shipyard, St Petersburg and launched in 1909. During its lifetime it was used for 19 patrols in the Baltic Sea during World War I. In 1915 it was sent on a mission to lay four mines on a fairway between Klaipeda and Liepaja. Instead, on November 15th, it itself hit a mine and sank en route to the mission location. All 35 crewmembers perished.

Data about the wreck

Location: Baltic Sea, north of Kõpu Peninsula in Hiiumaa
Coordinates: 59° 08.502N, 22° 11.663E
Depth of wreck: 24 metres
Depth of surrounding area: 29 metres
Dimensions of wreck: length 40 metres, breadth 4 metres
Dimension of the original submarine: 56 x 3.7 x 3.4 metres
Orientation of wreck: 82-262
Submerged displacement: 475 tons
Armament: The submarine carried eight torpedoes in total and had four torpedo tubes. 1 x 1-47 mm gun, four naval mines.

Status: The stern section of the submarine broke off as a result of the explosion. Some details of the wreck are scattered around it on the seabed. There are four mines with mechanical fuse mechanisms on the seabed by the port side. The casings of some mines have become dilapidated, exposing the combustion chambers inside. The torpedoes that may be in the launching tubes are not a threat. One torpedo stands upright between the bridge and the stern at an angle of ca 60 degrees. The upper end of the combustion chamber with the fuse is missing and the explosive in the chamber can be seen.

Cultural monument reg. no. 30392, register.muinas.ee
Diving is permitted only under the instruction of a licensed business operator or with a diving permit from the National Heritage Board of Estonia.
Suitable for experienced divers. Diving to the wreck is not dangerous when the requirements for diving to monuments are followed. During the navigation season there is an anchor buoy placed next to the wreck.

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